Updated 8:49 am, May 24, 2018

Why school dropout rate is on the rise among minorities | SNE

By  india today .
Apr 07, 2018

schooldrouput_reuters

Lack of toilets, classrooms, schools within a reasonable distance, absenteeism of teachers, abject poverty of parents are among the top reasons that have contributed to an increasing dropout rate among minority community children, according to a report by the National Productivity Council.

 

The report has pointed out that eight states Assam, Bihar, Haryana,Jharkhand,  Maharashtra, Rajasthan, Uttar Pradesh and West Bengal were found to have the highest dropout rates by minority children due to state-specific reasons.

 

The Ministry of Minority Affairs had asked the NPC to examine the reasons for high dropout rates among all minority communities, including Muslims, at all levels of education vis-à-vis other communities in the country, senior government officials told Mail Today.

 

The interim report of the study was submitted to the ministry that has further forwarded it to a parliamentary standing committee on social justice.

 

As per the report, the eight states do not even have basic facilities like toilets, sufficient number of upper primary schools within a reasonable distance, sufficient classrooms due to which students have to sit under trees or kachcha houses, sufficient benches and desks and pitiable condition of furniture, absence of electricity and fans, no separate toilets for boys and girls, no boundary walls, no playgrounds, no trained teachers or ill-qualified contractual teachers, no library.

 

The schools are at long distances from residential areas, absenteeism of teachers, the extreme poverty of parents, were cited as a few other general findings in addition to state-specific issues.

 

The report also goes on to highlight that the ministry of minority affairs has not sent any team of their officials to collect first-hand information on the pitiable condition of these schools and neither has any monitoring ever been done.

 

Taking note of the findings, the parliamentary panel has rapped the ministry for its apathy.

 

The committee is aware that the responsibility of running and managing these schools rest with the state governments. Nevertheless, the committee finds total apathy on the part of the ministry too towards educating the children of minority communities through these schools. The committee wants to remind the ministry of its first and foremost mandate, which is educational empowerment of minorities and in which the ministry has not only totally failed but found lacking too, the panel concluded.

 

The committee has recommended the ministry to go through the report of the NPC thoroughly and send a team of its officials to the high dropout rate states and act on the suggestions given in the report.

 

The committee has also sought an action taken report by the ministry on the suggestions given in the NPC study. The study included students from all notified minority communities namely, Muslims, Christians, Sikhs, Buddhists, Parsis and Jains that constitute more than 19 per cent of Indias population.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Most watched

Apr 13, 2017

Apr 13, 2017

Apr 13, 2017

Apr 13, 2017

Mar 20, 2017

Mar 20, 2017

Mar 20, 2017

Mar 11, 2017

Mar 11, 2017

Mar 11, 2017

Mar 11, 2017

Mar 11, 2017

Mar 11, 2017

Mar 11, 2017

Mar 11, 2017

Mar 11, 2017

Mar 11, 2017

Mar 11, 2017

Mar 11, 2017

Mar 11, 2017

Mar 11, 2017

Mar 11, 2017

Mar 11, 2017

Mar 11, 2017

Mar 11, 2017

Mar 11, 2017

Mar 11, 2017

Mar 11, 2017

Mar 11, 2017

Mar 11, 2017

Mar 11, 2017

Mar 11, 2017

Mar 11, 2017

Mar 11, 2017

Mar 11, 2017

Mar 11, 2017

Mar 11, 2017

Mar 11, 2017

Mar 11, 2017

Mar 11, 2017

Mar 11, 2017

Mar 11, 2017

Mar 11, 2017

Mar 11, 2017

Mar 11, 2017

Mar 11, 2017

Mar 11, 2017

Mar 11, 2017

Mar 11, 2017

Mar 11, 2017

Mar 11, 2017

Mar 11, 2017

Mar 11, 2017

Mar 11, 2017

Mar 11, 2017

Mar 11, 2017

Mar 11, 2017

Mar 11, 2017

Mar 11, 2017

Mar 11, 2017

Mar 11, 2017

Mar 11, 2017

Mar 11, 2017

Mar 11, 2017

Mar 11, 2017

Mar 11, 2017

Mar 11, 2017

Mar 11, 2017

Mar 11, 2017

Mar 11, 2017

Mar 11, 2017

Mar 11, 2017

Mar 11, 2017

Mar 11, 2017

Mar 11, 2017

Mar 11, 2017

Mar 11, 2017

Mar 11, 2017

Mar 11, 2017

Mar 11, 2017

22℃

United States
Mostly Cloudy
Humidity: 80%
Wind: 3.86 Km/h

27 May 2018

30.62℃ - 22.31℃

28 May 2018

29.7℃ - 19.6℃